The Electric Cure Will Cheers to Tiki Cocktails and Vintage Oddities in Edgewater

Edgewater tighten up, something electric this way comes.

Set for a grand opening party on August 6 ,The Electric Cure & Velvet Lounge will host a new concept near Sloan Lake featuring eerie cocktail infusions, tiki drinks and novelties.

Along with her partner Veronica Ramos, The Electric Cure’s owner, Lexi Healy, had a desire for a concept that focused on the whacky and weird parts of Denver. Unfortunately, years of bartending in the city, working under someone else, stopped her from letting loose on her creativity.

 

Ultimately, Healy left her long-time gig as general manager at Bowman’s Vinyl & Lounge. After experimenting with Harry Potter-themed cocktail pop-ups, she went in pursuit of her own vision for an eclectic cocktail bar.

It’s an amalgam of concepts, built into a small 800-square foot space that permits a more intimate experience, and Healy is keen on keeping things that way, for now.

“[We] want to stay small. Maybe one day in the future we’ll think about opening a venue-type space in Denver, but this is our baby right now. This is where everything we want to do is going to start,” said Healy.

She’d rather focus on building an inclusive, welcoming space that caters to Denver’s niche of history buffs, fans of strange oddities and cocktail enthusiasts – bonus if you like rum, Healy plans on introducing rotating daiquiris.

The drink menu will nod to some of Colorado’s under-the-radar bits of creepy history, including a drink named after Roger the Elephant – lore alleging an elephant buried in Edgewater – and The Colorado Cannibal, AKA Alferd Packer, while others will be named after original rides from Lakeside Amusement Park. A small bites menu will highlight local chef Andrea Murdoch with Four Directions Cuisine, serving indigenous-inspired dishes.

On top of displaying oddities – like vintage velvet paintings collected from thrift shops, estate sales and online auctions – Healy scopes and handpicks a curated selection of vinyl to serve as both decor and soundtrack. Custom record crates and shelves are handmade by local woodworker Dan Nevin, along with some handmade velvet paintings by Healy herself, incorporate a vintage and contemporary atmosphere.

“I fell in love with vinyl records while managing Bowman’s Vinyl & Lounge and decided to bring that aspect of the business with me to the Electric Cure,” said Healy.

Aside from the neon signs, everything is second-hand, up-cycled or reclaimed into the bar one way or another. The bar top is made from reclaimed bowling ally floor, while the barstools and equipment were bought out by Healy and Ramos from restaurants and bars that didn’t make it through the pandemic.

Despite limited space, Healy plans to host future events at the Electric Cure, including custom cocktail classes that will pair with an entire experience, paint nights and collaborations with community members and small local businesses as she builds her one-of-a-kind alcove near Sloan Lake.

“Where most establishments with custom designs and furniture have a grip of financial backing, we were able to keep costs low and do everything ourselves and completely in house,” said Healy.

With a liquor licensed officially approved on July 20, Healy’s concept is inching closer to its grand opening. The party this Friday will offer caricatures by Alex Ferreira, specialty house cocktail infusions, food from The Lost Boys and local DJ Drop Logik spinning vinyl.

Guests will also be able to purchase from local artists including Kolorsandshapez and Adventures in Lilyland.

“We want to set the highest standard for social responsibility and practice what we preach and use our business as a force for good as we give people a space where they can feel welcome as we build personal connections with the community and have a positive influence on Edgewater,” added Healy.

The Electric Cure is located at 5350 W. 25th Avenue.

All photography courtesy of The Electric Cure.