It’s as if the word “green” has become so trendy it’s commonplace; almost to the point that we don’t even notice how extraordinary the idea of being ecological is after years of pursuing unsustainable practices. But being green is no fleeting fad; this is fashion’s future.

In honor of Earth Day this Sunday, I thought it apropos to highlight the budding theme of eco-friendly design. While I’m generally aware of the greening efforts in the business, I have to admit that specific initiatives were a bit esoteric to me.

Today, though, I have a much better understanding of how brands are putting thought into their threads. And, what I was most pleased to discover in this process is that environmentally friendly fashions don’t necessary sacrifice style for sustainability.

Green fashion is becoming more widespread and embraced with the help of brands like H&M (the mass retailer has a collection of conscious clothing) and Edun (started by mega musician Bono and his wife).  But the idea of being eco chic is reaching a much broader design base. Here I’ve highlighted some of my favorite finds in the environmentally friendly fashion world.

We all love our Havaianas flip flops, but did you know the brand has a line of flats called Havaianas Origine Eco Espadrilles? They’re made of jute, which is grown alongside the Amazonian River and doesn’t require any fertilizers or pesticides. They come in several naturally died colors and retail for $38. Total shoe-in.

Havaianas Origine Eco Espadrille

Denim designer AG Adriano Goldschmied now produces all of its denim jeans using “Ozone Technology,” a process that significantly reduces water consumption, use of chemicals and energy. Here is The Stilt Jean, which retails for $159, looking gloriously green (in every sense of the word).

AG The Stilt Jeans

When thinking of “green” the concept of “glamorous” doesn’t necessarily come to mind. But New York based designer Allison Parris is changing that with her line of gorgeous, girly eco-friendly formal wear. Her chic clothes are made in local factories and utilize organic silks and fabrics made of recycled materials. I can’t get enough of this majorly on trend strapless peplum dress (price upon request) and tulle skirt ($325).

Allison Parris Side Swag Dress

 

Allison Parris Tulle Miniskirt

I’m beyond excited to share with you my latest jewelry obsession – Alkemie jewelry. Alkemie is one of the most environmentally and socially responsible lines of jewelry, forged from 100% reclaimed metals and handmade in the US. Check out this statement Manta Ray ring, which retails for $154, and this playful zipper bangle, which retails for $176. Pure green genius.

Alkemie Manta Ray Ring

 

Alkemie Zipper Bangle

The Green with Glamour boutique has everything from home goods to clothing to accessories. Named one of Time Magazine’s “The Green Design 100,” Green with Glamour ships all products in reusable packaging whenever possible and is a 1% For The Planet company – meaning they’re committed to donating 1% of sales to environmental organizations every year. I love Curator’s Kimmie tee in this season’s hottest hue, orange. It’s made in America from 100% organic cotton tissue jersey and finished with a laser cut detail. And, at $79, it’s a no brainer. Also available on the online boutique are Jennifer Dawes’s dew drop earrings. They feature turquoise and diamonds made from recycled golds & and conflict-free gems. At $1,050, it’s an investment in your wardrobe and also the environment.

Green With Glamour Kimmie Top

Green With Glamour Dew Drop Earrings

It’s clear that designs that promote protecting the planet are pervasive. So, do your part and support them. After all, what’s more fashionable than being environmentally conscious?

 

Rachel is a Denver native, currently residing in Los Angeles. She has worked for some of fashion’s most recognizable brands and is a devoted fashionista. From trend analysis to street style to what’s next, Rachel has her finger on the pulse. Style is a lifestyle and she is living it.

 

 

One Response

  1. Gerson

    Thank you for this insider perviectpse on Lenny’s. As an Atlanta music promoter, I often wonder what the hell is going on inside the heads of some of these venue owners. A few thoughts:(1) I have absolutely zero sympathy for Lenny’s, save the bartenders who are now ranked among the unemployed, because businesses that make poor decisions are doomed to fail as per the ephemeral laws of capitalism. I knew Chris Conway was a Con- artist the one and only time I tried to deal with him. He and his company had absolutely no paper trail on the web, his email domain was not attributed to an actual website, he was a general dick, and his terms were completely ridiculous. No wonder they lost business. Shame on Lenny’s for not vetting their hires more carefully.(2) I do not agree with the way this article stereotypes the Atlanta music scene as too cool for itself and one of the reasons Lenny failed. Maybe you’ve just been hanging out with some egotistical people, but my experience has not been the same. All musicians are to some degree standoffish because its a competitive industry, but that’s just part of the package. Its like hating on athletes for being in shape. How can you blame the music scene for Lenny’s demise when dozens of other local venues continue to thrive, as they have for years? Collaboration doesn’t happen organically in the music scene it has to be cultivated and led by a network of people who know what they’re doing. I respect differing opinion on this, because everyone’s experience is naturally different, but off-hand I find blaming an amorphous music scene offensive, short-sighted, and misguided.

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