Everything You Need to Know About Denver’s Stay-at-Home Order

[Update April 24 at 11:27 a.m.: The City and County of Denver’s stay-at-home order was extended to May 8 and is scheduled to end May 9. Mayor Hancock held a press conference on  April 24 at 10 a.m. Go here for more information on the press conference and here to read the updated order. Currently, Colorado’s stay-at-home order is still scheduled to end April 27.]

[UPDATE April 6 at 7:00 p.m. Colorado Governor Jared Polis extended the statewide stay-at-home order to April 26, several days short of the national goal of April 30. The Governor also encouraged all Coloradans to wear a cloth face covering or homemade mask when going out in public. Rewatch the livestream here.]

[UPDATE April 6 at 4:06 p.m. The City and County of Denver extended its stay-at-home order and ban on mass gatherings through April 30. Failure to comply with this stay-at-home order could now result in a fine of up to $999.]

[UPDATE March 27 at 5:33 p.m. Denver’s Stay-at-Home order has been aligned with Colorado’s broader stay-at-home order. Go here for more info on Colorado’s order.]

[UPDATE March 25 at 5:03 p.m. Colorado Governor Jared Polis extended the stay-at-home order to all of Colorado effective March 26 at 6 a.m. and ends on April 11. It is similar to the one in place in Denver. Go here to watch the press conference.]  

[UPDATE March 25 at 12:05 p.m.: According to the Mayor’s office if a brewery has an “approved sales room,” they can also sell for off-premises consumption. Distilleries and wineries may continue to manufacture liquor and wine in order to support and supply other essential businesses like restaurants, liquor stores and other retail outlets. However, distilleries and wineries may not conduct sales of alcoholic beverages for off-premises consumption to customers unless as a part of a sale of food like other restaurants and bars.]

[UPDATE March 23, 2020 at 5:18 p.m.: According to the City and County of Denver Government’s Facebook page, the following amendments have been made and the article has been updated accordingly:

  • Liquor stores with extreme physical distancing in place will be exempt.
  • All marijuana stores with extreme physical distancing in place will be exempt.
  • All construction operations and projects will be exempt. According to the post, this is an evolving situation and guidance will continue to be refined to ensure that all physical distancing measures are having the desired impact. ]

On the afternoon of Monday, March 23, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock issued a stay-at-home order that will go into effect at 5 p.m. tomorrow for Denver county. The order will last until April 10, though it may be extended if necessary. Watch the full press conference here. Hancock cited during his press conference, full parks and public spaces over the weekend as one of his motivators for this order, as well as Denver having a large and dense populace.

  • Governors and mayors across the country have ordered their respective residents to stay at home, and each decree has slightly different characteristics. During the mayor’s live-streamed response update at 2 p.m., he outlined what this particular order means for Denver residents:
  • All residents of the city of Denver are ordered (not recommended) to stay at home unless they are performing essential activities, such as getting groceries, obtaining medical supplies or medication and/or engaging in outdoor activities like walking, hiking or running. Throughout the essential excursion, everyone must continue their strict observance of physical distancing practices — each person should give themselves a distance of six feet from others.
  • Checking in on family members (such as an older relatives you care for) that live in a different household than your own is still allowed — if you are not sick.
  • All group activities are asked to be canceled until April 10, even those that involve less than 10 people.
  • Public parks will remain open, but organized activities are prohibited — including picnics and loosely organized sports or games like pickup basketball and volleyball. All playgrounds will be closed.
  • Enforcement will largely rely on “voluntary compliance” with support from police officers and park rangers that will patrol public parks and public spaces. They will step in to educate if they encounter noncompliance with the stay-at-home order. Hancock said officials will “inform, discourage, and enforce as necessary,” although exact enforcement or ticketing information was not released.
  • After an update was made around 5 p.m. following the initial announcement,  liquor stores with extreme physical distancing in place will be allowed to stay open. All marijuana stores with extreme physical distancing in place will be allowed to stay open. All construction operations and projects will be allowed to be continued. It is unclear what “extreme physical distancing” means specifically.
  • Restaurants can still fulfill to-go, delivery and drive-thru orders. It is unclear if that includes bars and distilleries as well. Breweries are exempt if they have an “approved sales room” permit. Distilleries and wineries may continue to manufacture liquor and wine in order to support and supply other essential businesses like restaurants, liquor stores and other retail outlets. However, distilleries and wineries may not conduct sales of alcohol beverages for off-premises consumption to customers unless as a part of a sale of food like other restaurants and bars.
  • The Denver International Airport will continue to operate, and flights are still allowed to leave. Patrons of the airport and the airlines it hosts are asked to take part in physical distancing.
  • Public transportation, as well as ride-share services like Uber and Lyft, will continue to operate.
  • This order does not apply to the homeless population, but they are strongly urged to take shelter. The current strategy involves supporting current housing, creating more housing and temporary shelter through the support of hotels and motels.
  • Individuals may leave their residence to work for or obtain services for “Healthcare Operations” including, but not limited to:
    • Hospitals, clinics, and walk-in health facilities 
    • Medical and dental care, excluding elective procedures 
    • Research and laboratory services
    • Medical wholesale and distribution
    • Home healthcare companies, workers, and aides
    • Pharmacies, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies
    • Behavioral health care providers 
    • Nursing homes, residential healthcare, or congregate care facilities
    • Medical supplies and equipment manufacturers and providers, or any related and/or ancillary healthcare services
    • Veterinary care, livestock services, and all healthcare services provided to animals
    • Animal shelters and pet boarding services 
    • This exemption shall be construed broadly to avoid any impacts to the delivery of healthcare, broadly defined. 
    • “Healthcare Operations” does not include health clubs, fitness and exercise gyms, and similar facilities.
  • All nonessential businesses will be closed and business inspectors will work to discourage continued operation. Essential businesses include:
    • Healthcare Operations, Essential Infrastructure and Essential Governmental Functions
    • Grocery stores, certified farmers’ markets and produce stands, supermarkets, food banks, convenience stores,  and similar businesses
    • Food and plant cultivation, including farming, livestock, and fishing
    • Businesses that provide food, shelter, and social services, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals
    • Newspapers, television, radio, and other media services
    • Gas stations and auto-supply, auto-repair, and related facilities
    • Banks and related financial institutions
    • Hardware stores
    • Plumbers, electricians, exterminators, and other service providers who provide services that are necessary to maintaining the safety, sanitation, and essential operation of residences
    • Businesses providing mailing and shipping services, including post office boxes;
    • Educational institutions-including public and private K-12 schools, colleges, and universities for purposes of facilitating distance learning or performing essential functions, provided that social distancing of six-feet per person is maintained to the greatest extent possible
    • Laundromats, dry cleaners, and laundry service providers
    • Restaurants and other facilities that prepare and serve food as well as businesses that ship or deliver groceries, food, goods or services directly to residences
    • Childcare facilities providing services that enable employees exempted in this Order to work as permitted. Mandatory conditions apply and can be found in the complete order.
  • A complete list of essential businesses can be found here.
  • Go here to read the complete order