153832916You might call it a tortilla, maybe naan or even a pancake but no matter the name everyone has their favorite flat bread. It’s a staple, a must have on every plate. It’s the food of subsistence upon which our ancestors have lived and the culinary canvases where generations have defined eras. It’s one of those foods that seems to be universal and almost every culture has created their own unique version. Because without it you couldn’t sop up your soups, dip into your olive oils, or even eat your favorite pizza. The flat bread  even within our no carb, gluten-free diets, still reigns supreme. And if you really want to get to know a culture in a culinary sense, start with their flat bread because it’s the easiest way to find out what makes them different but also the same. So here are a couple of different flat breads that you’ve probably never heard of and why you should try them and where you can get them:

Injera: This Ethiopian standard is everything to their cuisine, including their cutlery. Because rather than using forks or knives Injera serves as the vehicle for the wonderful spices  and flavors of this Eastern African country. It’s definitely an experience all on its own… Try Abyssinia for the best Injera. Located at 4116 E Colfax Ave Denver, CO 80220

Injera

Injera

Lefse: This Nordic flat bread is made from potatoes, butter and cream.  I think the ingredients speak for themselves because this stuff is irresistible. Best place to get it? Kings Norsk Bakery, 3905 Dover St Wheatridge, CO

Lefse. Photo Courtesy of thekitchn.com

Lefse. Photo Courtesy of thekitchn.com

Puri: Also known as Fry Bread, Puri is a puffy Native American bread that can be filled with delicious spicy and savory flavors of the Southwest or a nice dessert if eaten on its own. The only place to get it in town? Tocabe in the Highlands. It’s one of my personal favorite restaurants, so if you want to know more read about my experience here.

Fry Bread. Photo Courtesy of Tocabe.com

Fry Bread. Photo Courtesy of Tocabe.com

Dosa: A crepe like concoctions made from rice batter and black lentils is popular food in Southeast Asia, particularly Southern India and Myanmar (Burma). Its very crispy and a great contrast to the sauce heavy foods of this region. Try it at Dosa Queen, the name says it all. Located off East Colfax and Madison.

Dosa

Dosa

 

About The Author

Food and Booze Editor

Brittany is an avid NPR listener, history buff, amateur chef and a collector of exotic spices. When she is not in Denver you can find her traveling all over the globe in search of the perfect bite. Her favorite travel designation right now? Aqaba, Jordan. But she hopes to go to Sudan and Singapore next. Follow her on all of her adventures on by going to her Instagram and Twitter

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